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BANKRUPTCY FRAUD

Each lawyer at the top rated Joe Griffith Law Firm has a wealth of experience in the legal areas of bankruptcy fraud and white collar criminal law. Our lawyers are located in Charleston and Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina, and devote 100% of their practices to litigation. White collar crime and white collar bank fraud defense litigation are a major focus of our practice. Lead by former federal prosecutor Joseph P. Griffith, Jr., the Joe Griffith Law Firm is designated as an AV rated firm by the prestigious Martindale-Hubbell® attorney rating company, signifying the highest possible ranking for legal ability and ethics as judged by peers in the legal profession. Every attorney at our firm is dedicated to providing outstanding legal service to each of our clients and will fight to protect them to the fullest extent allowable under the law. Client satisfaction is our number one goal.

A white collar crime is a serious offense in South Carolina and throughout the United States (“US”). A white collar federal bankruptcy fraud criminal conviction can have life altering consequences. If you are being investigated for, or have been indicted or otherwise charged with, the crime of bankruptcy fraud, you should immediately contact the Joe Griffith Law Firm for a free consultation.

The federal bankruptcy fraud criminal provisions, which are applicable to any proceeding, arrangement or plan under the Bankruptcy Code, Title 11 of the United States Code, are found at 18 U.S.C. §§ 152 to 157. A violation of any of these provisions is generally considered to be a white collar crime. These bankruptcy fraud statutes were promulgated to preserve honesty in the administration of bankruptcy proceedings and to ensure that creditors receive their fair share of the bankrupt’s estate. 18 U.S.C. § 151 provides that “the term ‘debtor’ means a debtor concerning whom a petition has been filed under Title 11.”

18 U.S.C. § 3057(a) requires that a judge, receiver or trustee having reasonable grounds for believing that a violation of federal laws relating to bankruptcy and receiverships has been committed must report all the facts and circumstances to the appropriate United States Attorney Office, which conducts an investigation thereof, and determines whether to prosecute or decline the case. Generally, however, the procedures set forth in 18 U.S.C. § 3057(a) do not provide the defendant any substantive or procedural rights. Dean v. United States, 51 F.2d 481 (9th Cir. 1931); United States v. Filiberti, 353 F.Supp. 252 (D.Conn. 1973); In re Kalina, 202 B.R. 600 (N.D.Ill. 1996).

18 U.S.C. § 152. Concealment of assets; false oaths and claims; bribery. 18 U.S.C. § 152 has nine subsections setting forth separate criminal law violations relating to concealment of assets, false oaths, false claims and bribery. This statute provides as follows:

A person who:

  1. Knowingly and fraudulently conceals from a custodian, trustee, marshal, or other officer of the court charged with the control or custody of property, or, in connection with a case under Title 11, from creditors or the United States Trustee, any property belonging to the estate of a debtor;
  2. Knowingly and fraudulently makes a false oath or account in or in relation to any case under Title 11;
  3. Knowingly and fraudulently makes a false declaration, certificate, verification, or statement under penalty of perjury as permitted under section 1746 of Title 28, in or in relation to any case under Title 11;
  4. Knowingly and fraudulently presents any false claim for proof against the estate of a debtor, or uses any such claim in any case under Title 11, in a personal capacity or as or through an agent, proxy, or attorney;
  5. Knowingly and fraudulently receives any material amount of property from a debtor after the filing of a case under Title 11, with intent to defeat the provisions of Title 11;
  6. Knowingly and fraudulently gives, offers, receives, or attempts to obtain any money or property, remuneration, compensation, reward, advantage, or promise thereof for acting or forbearing to act in any case under Title 11;
  7. In a personal capacity or as an agent or officer of any person or corporation, in contemplation of a case under Title 11 by or against the person or any other person or corporation, or with intent to defeat the provisions of Title 11, knowingly and fraudulently transfers or conceals any of his property or the property of such other person or corporation;
  8. After the filing of a case under Title 11 or in contemplation thereof, knowingly and fraudulently conceals, destroys, mutilates, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any recorded information (including books, documents, records, and papers) relating to the property or financial affairs of a debtor; or
  9. After the filing of a case under Title 11, knowingly and fraudulently withholds from a custodian, trustee, marshal, or other officer of the court or a United States Trustee entitled to its possession, any recorded information (including books, documents, records, and papers) relating to the property or financial affairs of a debtor, shall be fined under this Title, imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.

In brief, these nine subsections of 18 U.S.C. § 152 prohibit the following activities:

  1. The concealment of property belonging to the estate of a debtor;
  2. The making of false oaths or accounts in relation to any case under Title 11;
  3. The making of a false declaration, certificate, verification or statement under penalty of perjury in relation to any case under Title 11;
  4. The making of false claims against the estate of a debtor;
  5. The fraudulent receipt of property from a debtor;
  6. Bribery and extortion in connection with a case under Title 11;
  7. Transfer or concealment of property during or in contemplation of a case under Title 11;
  8. The concealment or destruction of documents relating to the property or affairs of a debtor during or in contemplation of a case under Title 11; and
  9. The withholding of documents from the administrators of a case under Title 11.

These nine subsections of 18 U.S.C. § 152 create separate crimes, the violation of which may be indicted separately because each requires proof of a different set of facts. United States v. Gordon , 379 F.2d 788, 790 (2d Cir.), cert. denied, 389 U.S. 927 (1967); United States v. Arge, 418 F.2d 721 (10th Cir. 1969); United States v. Roberts, 783 F.2d 767 (9th Cir. 1985); United States v. Christner, 66 F.3d 922, 928 (8th Cir. 1995).

All of the crimes set forth in subsections of Section 152 require that the criminal act be done "knowingly" and "fraudulently." An inadvertent error does not support a violation of Section 152. United States v. Ellis, 50 F.3d 419, 426 (7th Cir.), cert. denied, 116 S. Ct. 143 (1995); United States v. Smithson, 49 F.3d 138, 142 (5th Cir. 1995) (act is knowingly when done voluntarily and intentionally and not because of mistake or accident).

The term "fraudulently" means that the act was done with the intent to deceive. United States v. Diorio, 451 F.2d 21, 23 (2d Cir. 1971), cert. denied, 405 U.S. 955 (1972). Fraudulent intent may be proven circumstantially. United States v. Goodstein, 883 F.2d 1362, 1370 (7th Cir. 1989), cert. denied, 494 U.S. 1007 (1990). The government does not have to prove that the defendant knew that he was breaking the law. United States v. Zehrbach, 47 F.3d 1252 (en banc) (3d Cir. 1995), cert. denied, 115 S. Ct. 1699 (1995).

The government must show that the defendant was contemplating a bankruptcy or intended to defeat the bankruptcy laws in order to obtain a conviction for transferring property in contemplation of bankruptcy. However, circumstantial evidence of pre-bankruptcy activities such as secret insider deals, less than arm’s length transactions, efforts to generate greater cash flow, and the weak financial condition of a company, can be evidence that the acts were in contemplation of bankruptcy. United States v. Martin, 408 F.2d 949, 954 (7th Cir.), cert. denied, 396 U.S. 824 (1969); United States v. Haymes, 610 F.2d 309 (5th Cir. 1980); United States v. Ayotte, 385 F.2d 988, 991 (6th Cir. 1967), vacated on other grounds sub nom Giordano v. United States, 394 U.S. 310 (1969) (secret inventory removal and failure to pay debts were in contemplation of bankruptcy); United States v. Butler, 704 F. Supp. 1338, 1347 (E.D.Va. 1989), aff'd w/o op., 905 F.2d 1532 (4th Cir.) cert. denied, 498 U.S. 900 (1990) (defendant's attempts to obtain payment from debtor for his legal fees prior to declaration of bankruptcy showed acts in contemplation of bankruptcy); United States v. Willey, 57 F.3d 1374, 1380 (5th Cir.), cert. denied, 116 S. Ct. 675 (1995) (defendant's affidavit in a divorce proceeding that he was considering bankruptcy relief followed by transfer of assets showed acts in contemplation of bankruptcy).

Venue is proper in the district in which the bankruptcy proceeding is located or the district which is the situs of the trustee. United States v. Schireson, 116 F.2d 881, 884 (3d Cir. 1940); United States v. Brimberry, 779 F.2d 1339, 1345 (8th Cir. 1985); United States v. Martin, 408 F.2d 949, 953 (7th Cir.), cert. denied, 396 U.S. 824 (1969), United States v. Gordon, 379 F.2d 788, 791 (2d Cir.), cert. denied, 389 U.S. 927 (1967); United States v. Zimmerman, 158 F.2d 559 (7th Cir. 1946).

18 U.S.C. § 152(1) Elements of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of concealment under 18 U.S.C. § 152(1) that the government must prove are:

  • The bankruptcy proceeding was in existence;
  • The defendant knowingly and fraudulently concealed the property from the trustee or other bankruptcy officer; and,
  • The property belonged to the bankruptcy estate.

United States v. Wagner , 382 F.3d 598 (6th Cir. 2004); United States v. Guiliano, 644 F.2d 85, 87 (2d Cir. 1981); United States v. Beery, 678 F.2d 856 (10th Cir. 1982), cert. denied, 471 U.S. 1066 (1985).

18 U.S.C. § 152(2) Elements of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of a false oath violation under 18 U.S.C. § 152(2) that the government must prove are:

  • The existence of a bankruptcy proceeding;
  • A statement made under oath therein, or in relation thereto;
  • The oath was as to a material fact;
  • The oath was false; and,
  • The oath was knowingly and fraudulently false.

Metheany v. United States , 390 F.2d 559, 561 (9th Cir.), cert. denied, 393 U.S. 824 (1968).

18 U.S.C. § 152(3) Elements of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of a false declaration violation under 18 U.S.C. § 152(3) that the government must prove are:

  • The existence of a bankruptcy proceeding;
  • The defendant made a false declaration, certificate, verification, or other statement in relation to the bankruptcy proceeding;
  • The statement must be material; and,
  • The statement was knowingly false and fraudulent.

Devitt, Blackmar & O'Malley, 2 Federal Jury Practice and Instructions, § 24.07 (4th ed. 1990).

18 U.S.C. § 152(4) Elements of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of a false claim violation under 18 U.S.C. § 152(4) that the government must prove are:

  • That a bankruptcy proceeding had been commenced;
  • That defendant presented or caused to be presented a proof of claim in the bankruptcy proceeding;
  • That the proof of claim was false as to a material matter; and,
  • That the defendant knew the proof of claim was false and acted knowingly and fraudulently.

United States v. Overmyer , 867 F.2d 937, 949 (6th Cir.), cert. denied, 493 U.S. 813 (1989).

18 U.S.C. § 152(5) Elements of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of a fraudulent receipt of property violation under 18 U.S.C. § 152(5) that the government must prove are:

  • The defendant received a material amount of property from a debtor;
  • Such transfer occurred after the filing of a case under Title 11; and,
  • The acts were knowingly and fraudulently done with the intent to defeat the provisions of Title 11.

18 U.S.C. § 152(6) Elements of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of an unlawful bribery or kickback violation under 18 U.S.C. § 152(6) that the government must prove are:

  • The defendant gives, offers, receives or attempts to obtain;
  • Money or property, remuneration, compensation, reward, advantage, or promise thereof;
  • For acting or forbearing to act in any case under Title 11; and,
  • The defendant acts knowingly and fraudulently.

United States v. Weiss , 168 F. Supp. 728 (W.D. Pa. 1958) (bidder agreeing to withdraw the bid in return for money is a violation). Note, however, that public disclosure of an offer to act or to not act, such as settlement or compromise of claims, will generally negate the element of criminal intent.

18 U.S.C. § 152(7) Elements of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of an unlawful transfer or concealment of assets violation under 18 U.S.C. § 152(7) that the government must prove are:

  • The defendant fraudulently transferred or concealed the defendant's property or the property of another; and,
  • Such act of transfer or concealment was knowingly done with the intent to defeat the provisions of Title 11, or in contemplation of a case under Title 11.

Section 152(7) applies to both pre-petition and post-petition transactions and prohibits both the concealment and transfer of assets as separate crimes. Burchinal v. United States, 342 F.2d 982, 985 (10th Cir.), cert. denied, 382 U.S. 843 (1965).

18 U.S.C. § 152(8) Elements of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of an unlawful concealment, destruction or falsification of records violation under 18 U.S.C. § 152(8) that the government must prove are:

  • A bankruptcy proceeding existed;
  • The defendant concealed, destroyed, or mutilated the documents;
  • Such documents related to the property or financial affairs of the debtor; and,
  • The defendant acted knowingly and fraudulently.

Devitt & Blackmar, 2 Federal Jury Practice and Instructions, §§ 48.14 & 48.15 (1990 Supplement); United States v. McDaniel , 2006 WL 839095 (W.D.Mich.).

18 U.S.C. § 152(9) Element of the crime:

The criminal law elements of the offense of an unlawful withholding of information violation under 18 U.S.C. § 152(9) that the government must prove are:

  • A bankruptcy proceeding existed;
  • The defendant withheld from the trustee entitled to its possession, books, documents, records, or papers;
  • Such documents related to the property or financial affairs of the debtor; and,
  • The defendant withheld the documents knowingly and fraudulently.

Devitt & Blackmar, 2 Federal Jury Practice and Instructions, §§ 48.14 & 48.15 (1990 Supplement).

18 U.S.C. § 3284. Statute of Limitations.

Title 18 U.S.C. § 3284, a special statute of limitations which applies to bankruptcy cases involving the concealment of assets, provides as follows:

The concealment of assets of a debtor in a case under Title 11 shall be deemed to be a continuing offense until the debtor shall have been finally discharged or a discharge denied, and the period of limitations shall not begin to run until such final discharge or denial of discharge.

When a debtor either receives a discharge or is denied a discharge by court order, the five-year statute of limitations period pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 3282 commences upon the date of the discharge or denial of the discharge. However, when a debtor does not receive a discharge or a denial of a discharge, determining the commencement of the statute of limitations becomes difficult in bankruptcy concealment cases.

Because there are no provisions in Title 11 authorizing the grant of a discharge for a bankrupt corporation and an individual debtor’s bankruptcy case can be dismissed without a discharge being either granted or denied, the application of the statute of limitations can be confusing.

Some courts have held that a literal interpretation of 18 U.S.C. § 3284 meant that the statute would never run in the foregoing circumstances since a discharge was neither granted nor denied. At least one court has liberally construed the application of the statute of limitations in favor of the defendant and held that statute of limitations began on the date the individual defendant concealed the company assets.

18 U.S.C. § 153. Embezzlement against Estate.

Title 18 U.S.C. § 153 provides as follows:

  1. Offense. --A person described in subsection (b) who knowingly and fraudulently appropriates to the person's own use, embezzles, spends, or transfers any property or secretes or destroys any document belonging to the estate of a debtor shall be fined under this Title, imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.
  2. Person to whom section applies. --A person described in this subsection is one who has access to property or documents belonging to an estate by virtue of the person's participation in the administration of the estate as a trustee, custodian, marshal, attorney, or other officer of the court or as an agent, employee, or other person engaged by such an officer to perform a service with respect to the estate.

This section prohibits the embezzlement of property and the secretion or destruction of any document belonging to the estate of the debtor, and covers only those documents which are property of the bankrupt estate.

The criminal law elements of the offense of a bankruptcy embezzlement violation under 18 U.S.C. § 153 that the government must  prove are:

  • A bankruptcy proceeding existed;
  • The defendant person (as defined) appropriates for personal use, embezzles, spends or transfers any property of the bankruptcy estate; and,
  • The defendant acts knowingly and fraudulently.

The criminal law elements of the offense of a secretion or destruction of documents violation under 18 U.S.C. § 153 that the government must prove are:

  • A bankruptcy proceeding existed;
  • The defendant person (as defined) secretes or destroys any document of the bankruptcy estate; and,
  • The defendant acts knowingly and fraudulently.

18 U.S.C. § 154. Adverse Interest and Conduct.

Title 18 U.S.C. § 154 provides as follows:

A person who, being a custodian, trustee, marshal, or other officer of the court—

  1. Knowingly purchases, directly or indirectly, any property of the estate of which the person is such an officer in a case under Title 11;
  2. Knowingly refuses to permit a reasonable opportunity for the inspection by parties in interest of the documents and accounts relating to the affairs of estates in the person's charge by parties when directed by the court to do so; or
  3. Knowingly refuses to permit a reasonable opportunity for the inspection by the United States Trustee of the documents and accounts relating to the affairs of an estate in the person's charge, shall be fined under this Title and shall forfeit the person's office, which shall thereupon become vacant.

Sub-section (1) prohibits self-dealing by government officials, sub-section (2) prohibits the refusal to provide inspection of the bankruptcy estate’s documents and accounts when ordered by a court to provide such inspection, and sub-section (3) prohibits the refusal to permit the Trustee’s inspection of documents and accounts of the bankruptcy estate. All of the violations must be done knowingly, and, of note, any violation of this statute is an infraction punishable by a fine and removal from office.

18 U.S.C. § 155. Fee agreements in cases under Title 11 and receiverships.

Title 18 U.S.C. § 155 provides as follows:

Whoever, being a party in interest, whether as a debtor, creditor, receiver, trustee or representative of any of them, or attorney for any such party in interest, in any receivership or case under Title 11 in any United States court or under its supervision, knowingly and fraudulently enters into any agreement, express or implied, with another such party in interest or attorney for another such party in interest, for the purpose of fixing the fees or other compensation to be paid to any party in interest or to any attorney for any party in interest for services rendered in connection therewith, from the assets of the estate, shall be fined under this Title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.

This section prohibits any knowingly fraudulent compensation agreements by or between any of the interested parties to a bankruptcy estate which are to be paid from the estate, to wit, any debtor, creditor, receiver, trustee or their representative or attorney. A violation of this statute is a misdemeanor.

18 U.S.C. § 156. Knowing Disregard of Bankruptcy Laws.

Title 18 U.S.C. § 156 provides as follows:

  1. Definitions. --In this section--
    1. The term "bankruptcy petition preparer" means a person, other than the debtor's attorney or an employee of such an attorney, who prepares for compensation a document for filing; and
    2. The term "document for filing" means a petition or any other document prepared for filing by a debtor in a United States bankruptcy court or a United States district court in connection with a case under Title 11.
  2. Offense. --If a bankruptcy case or related proceeding is dismissed because of a knowing attempt by a bankruptcy petition preparer in any manner to disregard the requirements of Title 11, United States Code, or the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, the bankruptcy petition preparer shall be fined under this Title, imprisoned not more than 1 year, or both.

This section prohibits a bankruptcy petition preparer (as defined) from causing the dismissal of a bankruptcy petition or proceeding in knowing disregard of Title 11 or the Bankruptcy Rules, and makes any such violation a misdemeanor.

18 U.S.C. § 157. Bankruptcy Fraud.

Title 18 U.S.C. § 157 provides as follows:

A person who, having devised or intending to devise a scheme or artifice to defraud and for the purpose of executing or concealing such a scheme or artifice or attempting to do so--

  1. Files a petition under Title 11;
  2. Files a document in a proceeding under Title 11; or
  3. Makes a false or fraudulent representation, claim, or promise concerning or in relation to a proceeding under Title 11, at any time before or after the filing of the petition, or in relation to a proceeding falsely asserted to be pending under such Title, shall be fined under this Title, imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.

This section prohibits devising or intending to devise a scheme or artifice to defraud and, for purposes of executing or concealing the scheme either (1) filing a bankruptcy petition; (2) filing a document in a bankruptcy proceeding; or (3) making a false statement, claim, or promise (a) in relationship to a bankruptcy proceeding either before or after the filing of the petition; or (b) in relation to a proceeding falsely asserted to be pending under the Bankruptcy Code.

The criminal law elements of an offense under 18 U.S.C. § 157(1) that the government must prove are:

  • The existence of a scheme to defraud or intent to later formulate a scheme to defraud;
  • The filing of a bankruptcy petition; and,
  • For the purpose of knowingly executing or attempting to execute the scheme.

United States v. Wagner , 382 F.3d 598 (6th Cir. 2004); United States v. McDaniel , 2006 WL 839095 (W.D.Mich.); United States v. DeSantis, 237 F.3d 607, 613 (6th Cir. 2001); United States v. McBride, 362 F.3d 360, 373 (6th Cir. 2004).

The criminal law elements of an offense under 18 U.S.C. § 157(2) that the government must prove are:

  • The existence of a scheme to defraud or intent to later formulate a scheme to defraud;
  • The filing of a document in a bankruptcy proceeding; and,
  • For the purpose of knowingly executing or attempting to execute the scheme.

United States v. Wagner , 382 F.3d 598 (6th Cir. 2004).

The criminal law elements of an offense under 18 U.S.C. § 157(3) that the government must prove are:

  • The existence of a scheme to defraud or intent to later formulate a scheme to defraud;
  • The making of a false representation, claim or promise concerning or in relation to a pending bankruptcy proceeding or a bankruptcy proceeding falsely asserted to be pending; and,
  • For the purpose of knowingly executing or attempting to execute the scheme.

United States v. DeSantis , 237 F.3d 607 (6th Cir. 2001).

Sentencing regarding bankruptcy fraud violations is generally governed by the Section 2B1.1 of the United States Sentencing Guidelines, which are advisory pursuant to United States v. Booker, 125 S.Ct. 738 (2005), and the factors set forth in 18 U.S.C. § 3553(a). United States v. Coyle, 154 Fed.Appx. 173, 2005 WL 3005688 (C.A.11 (Ga.)); United States v. Brennan, 395 F.3d 59 (2d Cir. 2005).

18 U.S.C. § 3553 provides as follows:

  1. Factors to be considered in imposing a sentence. --The court shall impose a sentence sufficient, but not greater than necessary, to comply with the purposes set forth in paragraph (2) of this subsection. The court, in determining the particular sentence to be imposed, shall consider--
    1. The nature and circumstances of the offense and the history and characteristics of the defendant;
    2. The need for the sentence imposed--
      1. To reflect the seriousness of the offense, to promote respect for the law, and to provide just punishment for the offense;
      2. To afford adequate deterrence to criminal conduct;
      3. To protect the public from further crimes of the defendant; and
      4. To provide the defendant with needed educational or vocational training, medical care, or other correctional treatment in the most effective manner;
    3. The kinds of sentences available;
    4. The kinds of sentence and the sentencing range established for--
      1. The applicable category of offense committed by the applicable category of defendant as set forth in the guidelines--
        1. Issued by the Sentencing Commission pursuant to section 994(a)(1) of Title 28, United States Code, subject to any amendments made to such guidelines by act of Congress (regardless of whether such amendments have yet to be incorporated by the Sentencing Commission into amendments issued under section 994(p) of Title 28); and
        2. That, except as provided in section 3742(g), are in effect on the date the defendant is sentenced; or
      2. (B) In the case of a violation of probation or supervised release, the applicable guidelines or policy statements issued by the Sentencing Commission pursuant to section 994(a)(3) of Title 28, United States Code, taking into account any amendments made to such guidelines or policy statements by act of Congress (regardless of whether such amendments have yet to be incorporated by the Sentencing Commission into amendments issued under section 994(p) of Title 28);
    5. Any pertinent policy statement--
      1. Issued by the Sentencing Commission pursuant to section 994 (a)(2) of Title 28, United States Code, subject to any amendments made to such policy statement by act of Congress (regardless of whether such amendments have yet to be incorporated by the Sentencing Commission into amendments issued under section 994(p) of Title 28); and
      2. That, except as provided in section 3742(g), is in effect on the date the defendant is sentenced.
    6. The need to avoid unwarranted sentence disparities among defendants with similar records who have been found guilty of similar conduct; and
    7. The need to provide restitution to any victims of the offense.

The Joe Griffith Law Firm is a Charleston, South Carolina (“SC”) law firm that concentrates in white collar criminal litigation and bankruptcy fraud.

We represent those accused of criminal misdemeanors and/or felonies in a variety of state and federal proceedings including, but not limited to, initial appearances, preliminary hearings, bond hearings, trials, sentencing hearings, parole hearings, probation hearings, and appeals. We represent those designated “witnesses,” “subjects” or “targets” of grand jury criminal investigations, and have the experience to know when to assert 5th Amendment rights, make effective “proffer” statements, or demand immunity from government prosecutors. We are extremely effective in conducting pre-indictment investigations to gather and analyze evidence in order to make factual and legal presentations to prosecutors in an effort to persuade them to issue a declination whereby they agree to not indict a person or company under criminal investigation. We have been successful in having investigations declined pre-indictment. In the event of an indictment or other criminal charge, each of our attorneys stands ready to fight for our client and protect his or her legal rights to the fullest extent of the law.

If  you or your company have received a subject letter or target letter naming you as a subject or target of an alleged federal bankruptcy fraud crime, or have been charged in a criminal complaint or an indictment with the white collar crime of federal bankruptcy fraud, contact the Joe Griffith Law Firm immediately to discuss your legal rights.

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Joe Griffith Co-Authors Book On Health Care Fraud Joe Griffith Co-Authors Book On Securities Fraud
 
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